Week 5: Getting on with life (Living with Parkinson’s)

Course length

3 to 4 hours

Facilitators

Week 5: Getting on with life (Living with Parkinson’s)

Pille Taba

Week 5: Getting on with life (Living with Parkinson’s)

Katrin Sikk

Week 5: Getting on with life (Living with Parkinson’s)

Mari Muldmaa

Week 5: Getting on with life (Living with Parkinson’s)

Eve Reiljan

About the course

Parkinson’s disease (PD) may impact day to day life and make some daily routines more burdensome. Having a positive attitude to life and maintaining an active daily routine adapting daily activities as much as possible is vital for the management of PD in the long term.

Learning Objectives

Understand the impact of PD in common activities of daily life.
Learning practical tips that will help patients and caregivers improve their quality of life.

Summary & Scheduling

Parkinson’s disease (PD) may impact day to day life and make some daily routines more burdensome. Having a positive attitude to life and maintaining an active daily routine adapting daily activities as much as possible is vital for the management of PD in the long term.

Learning Content

Attitude: Keeping a positive attitude to life. Remaining optimistic. Acknowledging the role and needs of informal caregivers.
Knowledge: Participants are informed about:
• Sleep disturbances
• Emotional health
• Cognitive decline
• Economic and social burden
Skills: Participants will be provided with practical advice on how to cope with aspects of daily living (getting a good night’s sleep, cognitive training etc.)

Teaching Methods

• Presentation (slides)
• Video component
• Reading materials

Literature

• InfoPark Infosheets
• Miyasaki, J. M., & Kluger, B. (2015). Palliative care for Parkinson’s disease: has the time come?. Current neurology and neuroscience reports, 15(5), 26.
• McLaughlin et al. (2010). Living and coping with Parkinson’sdisease: Perceptions of informal carers. Palliative Medicine, 25(2), 177–182.
• Goy, E.R., Boling, A., Carter, J. (2015). Identifying Predictors of Hospice Eligibility in Patients With Parkinson Disease. American Journal of Hospice& Palliative Medicine, 32(1), 29-33.
• Strupp, J., Kunde, A., Galushko, M.,Voltz, R., Golla, H. (2017). Severely Affected by Parkinson Disease:The Patient’s View and Implicationsfor Palliative Care. American Journal of Hospice& Palliative Medicine, 1-7.
• Fereshtehnejad, S.-M. (2016). Strategies to maintain quality of life among people with Parkinson’s disease: what works?. Neurodegenerative Disease Management, 6(5), 399–415.
• Lim, S.-Y., Tan, A. H., Fox, S. H, Evans, A. H., Low, S. C. (2017). Integrating Patient Concerns into Parkinson’sDisease Management. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep, 17:3.
• Titova, N., Chaudhuri, R. K. (2017). Palliative Care and NonmotorSymptoms in Parkinson’s Diseaseand Parkinsonism. International Review of Neurobiology,134, 1239-55.
• Katz, M., Goto, Y., Kluger, B. M. (2018). Top Ten Tips Palliative Care Clinicians Should Know About Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 21(10):1507-1517.

Assessment

• Presentation (slides)
• Video component
• Reading materials